Tag: society

Rites of passage, how to become an adult

Becoming an adult is a gradual process, but is conventionally defined by a specific moment in which a young kid suddenly turns into a useful member of a society – even just with his or (more likely) her fertility. Populations in any time and place organized public celebrations that certified the entrance in adulthood, named “rites of passage” by the French anthropologist Arnold van Gennep…

Suicide and its ethics in societies

suicide cleopatra

Societies throughout history gave different meanings to suicide. It was considered acceptable, to a certain extent, by the Romans; it was in Mayans pantheon and in Norse mythology; it was codified by the Japanese in the Bushido. On the other hand, the idea of killing yourself was strongly rejected by the main religions, affecting secular laws too: in the United Kingdom and Ireland, suicide had been illegal until 1961 and 1993…

The role of fear in society

At a social level, fear is a tool of political and religious control. It’s used to build a society which may respond to our concerns about safety and security, guaranteeing a community life. In a present-oriented society, fear prevents from the lost of significance of the daily routine, creating consensus and legitimacy, keeping an unstable order just to avoid to consider new social forms…

Hate crime, a society failure (Hobbes was right)

We call for hate crime as an antidote to gender, orientation, ethnic, religious discriminations. And when the legislation of a Country includes those aggravating factors to already considered felonies we think is a step towards a more civilised society, finally equal. But if we change perspective we could think that those laws are contradictory, and the only reason to be happy is the awareness of the institutions that something isn’t going on right (euphemism)…

A tattoo is forever

tattoo mummy

When we say that a tattoo is for ever, we really mean it. Removal operations aside, the discovery of tattoed up mummies showed how the ink survives better than the skin thousend of years after the death. Embalming procedures are less frequent nowadays, of course, so “for ever” is limited to the life of the person who decides to decorate his or her body, until decay overcomes…