Category: Stereotype-in-English

I hate the mobile phone, don’t you?

be present with your friends who are here cell phone drop zone

Roma, Italy. A cellphone rings in a crowded bus. A boy takes it out of his pocket, turns the ringer off, and puts it back in place. The lady pressed up against him smiles and, with a sort of complicity, asks: “You don’t feel like answering, do you?” “No, now it’s not really the moment”. She sighs as a sign of understanding and comments “I’m not saying it’s not useful… but sometimes the phone is just a real hassle!”, “Yeah” he says while others around silently nod…

Greta Thunberg, if a symbol is still needed (Iconoclasty pt. 2)

The word symbol comes from ancient Greek, when it used to mean “token, watchword”. It was a combination of two terms, “throw” and “together”, so “throwing things together”. Now it’s something that can recall an idea which is different from the immediate, direct, literal aspect. In a nutshell, something evocative, whether it’s the big bad wolf in the fairy tales or Greta Thunberg’s braids…

The evil God of multitasking (which does not exist)

The stereotype of “knowing how to do more things together”, once assigned to women because they are “forced to juggle work and family”, and once to men because “they have so many responsibilities on them” (but perhaps the women’s stereotype wins in diffusion), it is generally seen as a quality, albeit tiring. Too bad that we are not machines, and therefore the infamous multitasking does not actually exist neither for women nor men…

The Middle Ages weren’t just “dark”

When you think about the Middle Ages you usually picture dearth and pestilence, violence, tortures and wars, peasants under the rule of a sadistic king or feudatory, creepy monks, scheming popes, inquisitors, ignorance, superstition, the end of the world in the year 1000 a.D. A long period too quickly labeled as “dark”, just a time of passage between the splendor of the classic era and Renaissance. That’s another misinterpretation, because history itself is a constant transition, an ongoing process, not only the Middle Ages. But this is what we learn at school…

Jineology, the kurdish science that frees women

tierra_y_libertad_by_scumbugg

Jineology? Never heard that. Is it a typo? Even searching on dictionaries and internet… nothing, Google continues to correct it in “genealogy”. The term in Italian does not seem to exist, nor even an analogue in English. When the only Italian source appears, three lines on il manifesto newspaper, suddenly everything was clear: ‘ah, it’s something that concerns women, as usual we don’t know anything about it…’

Kurdish Women’s Movement: “patriarchy is not natural”

“Have any of you ever studied the origins of patriarchy at school?” Dilar Dirik asks, researcher in Sociology at Cambridge University and activist of the Kurdish Women’s Movement. The rhetorical question slips into silence, so Dilar tries to summarize only 6.000 years of humanity on Earth, when, during Neolithic, the first “modern” societies were formed in Mesopotamia, India, China… matriarchal organizations, where women carried out internal, social, economic and political functions, and men external, subsistence and defense ones. At that time women had an enormous prestige, probably stemmed from the fact that they were considered the only procreative members of the group, prestige that it was taken away from them precisely when the men discovered their paternity…

Rites of passage, how to become an adult

Becoming an adult is a gradual process, but is conventionally defined by a specific moment in which a young kid suddenly turns into a useful member of a society – even just with his or (more likely) her fertility. Populations in any time and place organized public celebrations that certified the entrance in adulthood, named “rites of passage” by the French anthropologist Arnold van Gennep…

Suicide and its ethics in societies

suicide cleopatra

Societies throughout history gave different meanings to suicide. It was considered acceptable, to a certain extent, by the Romans; it was in Mayans pantheon and in Norse mythology; it was codified by the Japanese in the Bushido. On the other hand, the idea of killing yourself was strongly rejected by the main religions, affecting secular laws too: in the United Kingdom and Ireland, suicide had been illegal until 1961 and 1993…

Igbo-Ora, Nigeria: the home of twins

The average rate of multiple births is around 1% on a global scale, but there are many exceptions. Linha Sao Pedro, a small village in Brazil, reaches an abnormal 10%, enough to give rise to conspiracy theories, based on assumed experiments performed by the Nazis… Kodinji and Mohammadpur Umri, in India, have a 4,5% rate, more or less the same of Igbo-Ora, Nigeria, which gained the epithet of “home of twins”, with a welcome billboard as celebration…

New tango in Paris

Tango was inscribed in 2009 on the Represantative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. It’s commonly considered Argentinian, but we need to clarify a few things. It’s actually platense, from the mouth of Rio de la Plata, region shared between Argentina and Uruguay; it was born as a fusion of different sounds, rhythms and traditions from South America, Caribbean, Africa and even Europe; as a matter of fact, the current variations of this dance had been “cleaned up” by the Old Continent parlors – especially Paris…